Starbucks Plans To Hire 2,500 Refugees And Trump-Supporters Boycott Its Products

Starbucks has announced that it would hire 2,500 refugees to work at the company’s stores across Europe for five years, according to a worldwide policy, despite a US discontent at its plans.

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It announced on Tuesday it was planning to hire 2,500 refugees in collaboration with NGOs including the Refugee Council and the International Rescue Committee to work in eight European countries: the UK, France, Austria, Switzerland, Spain, Portugal, Germany, and the Netherlands.

The plan is a part of a worldwide policy in a bid of recruiting refugees to Europe. Not only would Europe accommodate potential Starbucks employees who are originally refugees but also Canada would hire around 1,000 refugees

The worldwide plan received tremendous backlash from some US consumers who threatened to boycott Starbucks, promoting hashtag #BoycottStarbucks when the decision was first announced in January this year.

The arguments were sparked off by some Americans as they denounced hiring people “who don’t belong here” rather than “American students [who] need a part-time job”, raising hashtag #AmericaFirst. 

A research done by firm Allegra Insights revealed that the coffee retail sector majorly depends on migrant labour from Europe.

Allegra Insights managing director Jeffrey Young said that Britain may suffer the lack of employees in Starbucks alongside other coffee chains after the Brexit as Britain largely depends on migrant labour. Britain’s coffee industry would be severely affected if it lost workers from Europe.

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“It’s a critical issue for the sector,” Young told BuzzFeed News. “We need 40,000 baristas by 2025, it’s very concerning for the industry.”

Andrea Wareham, the company’s HR director, said that the company attempted to attract British workers to its jobs, in addition to the fact that and that 65% of its employees were foreign.

Starbucks laid the blame a slowdown in profits and sales on Brexit’s door as it had weakened consumer confidence.

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